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How did NASA Steer the Saturn V?- Smarter Every Day 223 - Vidozee

How did NASA Steer the Saturn V?- Smarter Every Day 223
SmarterEveryDay — Published 1 week ago
Likes: 64, 935 — Dislikes: 754
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Get your 1st Audiobook + 2 Audible Originals Free when you try Audible for 30 days: https://www.audible.com/smarter or text "smarter" to 500 500
Behind the Scenes: https://youtu.be/6mMK6iSZsAs

View Linus's video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olRF5Ckaga0

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GET SMARTER SECTION

Functional Requirements for the Launch Vechile Digital Computer
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SmarterEveryDay
SmarterEveryDay I would like to point out several things:
1. Luke Talley is awesome.
2. Every single frame of this video requires more memory storage than this memory module is capable of handling. Think about that.
3. On the second channel we talk about things like how they took into account gyroscopic precession with this bad boy. They also crashed this into the moon and used the signal as a way to figure out what the inside of the moon is like. It's a good video, you should consider watching it. ( https://youtu.be/6mMK6iSZsAs )
4. This is not the Apollo computer. This is the Saturn V computer. They're different. This steered the rocket.
5. People that support Smarter Every Day on Patreon are really cool and I like them a lot. ( https://www.patreon.com/smartereveryday )
Abhinav Sharma
Abhinav Sharma Luke : "It was used in SATURN V"






Linus : "But will it run CRYSIS?!"
Terracom 7
Terracom 7 so I found a cool science anomaly that I haven't seen before and I searched it up and can't find it or an explanation. if you take a 2 by 4 block of aluminum and you put it on its side, so the short side is facing up. then if you slightly slant the block and roll a cylinder magnet down at a slight angle it will seem to bounce off the side of the wall as if there is an invisible barrier.
Ken Haley
Ken Haley At 2:00, you are describing "core" memory, which was the type of memory used in most computers up to around 1975-1980, when semiconductor memory first entered the scene. I worked on an IBM 1620, a 1401 and others, including a minicomputer made by a company called Microdata, which all used core memory. (I'm 72.)

I still have three 8K memory boards from that Microdata computer. (Failure of this type of memory was common, so I decided to save boards when they were replaced.) I remember they were priced at $3,500 each back then, or around 5 cents/bit. At that rate, 16GB of RAM (128 billion bits), now commonplace in PC's, would cost 6.4 billion dollars (without accounting for inflation)! That's over double the entire Apollo program budget. (Good thing they didn't need 16GB.)

Just as shown in this video, I can see the little cores arranged on the grid of wires. I was amazed back then, and I still find it impressive today. Here's an interesting fact about core memory: In order to read a bit, the computer would actually write a zero at that location. A sense wire running through all the bits on that plane would detect a pulse if that location originally contained a 1 because reversing the magnetic direction would induce that electric pulse. A second cycle was then required to restore the bit back to a 1 (or leave it as 0 if no pulse was detected). This was known as "destructive" read, requiring two machine cycles. One cycle on the Microdata was one microsecond (1 MHz). A modern CPU running at 4GHz is 4,000 times faster. But one cool thing: if the computer lost power, core memory was preserved! It wasn't 100% reliable, but often, when the computer was powered back on after a power failure, it could continue running where it left off!

Anyway, I am wondering what to do with these memory boards. Right now, they're just gathering dust in my closet. Any ideas?
Micha Grill
Micha Grill Not gonna lie that ad at the end was pretty salty :P
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